IP, Reports & Roadmaps | Mar 30, 2006

New materials for high efficiency organic solid state lighting

A new organic molecule developed by PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) scientists may significantly improve the efficiency of organic solid state lighting.

Direct conversion of electricity to light in “solid state” thin films of organic molecules occurs in organic light emitting devices which can be far more efficient than conventional “incandescent” light bulbs.

In an OLED, light emitting molecules harvest positive and negative charge carriers from oppositely charged electrodes to create excitons, which collapse to give light emission. By using organometallic phosphors, a photon can be emitted for every electron used so there is no wasted current.

But until now, no good host materials were available to transport the charge to blue phosphorescent light emitters. And, without an efficient blue component, it is not possible to generate the high quality white light required for indoor lighting. The PNNL team is solving this problem by linking small organic molecules together using inorganic “phosphine oxide” connecting units to make larger molecules that transport charge but do not interfere with the blue light emission process.

PNNL is a DOE Office of Science laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment and life sciences by advancing the understanding of physics, chemistry, biology and computation. PNNL employs 4,200 staff, has an annual budget of more than $725 million, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the lab's inception in 1965. 

In an OLED, light emitting molecules harvest positive and negative charge carriers from oppositely charged electrodes to create excitons, which collapse to give light emission. By using organometallic phosphors, a photon can be emitted for every electron used so there is no wasted current.

But until now, no good host materials were available to transport the charge to blue phosphorescent light emitters. And, without an efficient blue component, it is not possible to generate the high quality white light required for indoor lighting. The PNNL team is solving this problem by linking small organic molecules together using inorganic “phosphine oxide” connecting units to make larger molecules that transport charge but do not interfere with the blue light emission process.

PNNL is a DOE Office of Science laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment and life sciences by advancing the understanding of physics, chemistry, biology and computation. PNNL employs 4,200 staff, has an annual budget of more than $725 million, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the lab's inception in 1965.

 

Add comment

You can add a comment by filling out the form below. Plain text formatting. Comments are moderated.

Question: What is 1 + 4 ?
Your answer:
EDITORIAL

Advanced "Super-Planckian" Material Exhibits LED-Like Light When Heated

Advanced "Super-Planckian" Material Exhibits LED-Like Light When Heated Could there be a new kind of light in the universe? Since the late 19th century, scientists have understood that, when heated, all materials emit light in a predictable spectrum of wavelengths. Research published this week in Nature Scientific Reports presents a material that emits light when ... Read more »

EDITORIAL

LpS/TiL 2020 Cancelled

LpS/TiL 2020 Cancelled DORNBIRN, Austria, February 26, 2020 – In light of the recent postponement of Light + Building to September 2020 and due to the spread of the coronavirus, the organizer of LpS 2020 and TiL 2020, Luger Research e.U. has had to make the decision to cancel the LpS/TiL 2020 events. Read more »

EDITORIAL

WEBINAR (May 14th): How to Achieve Better Products to the Eye Through Virtual Prototyping?

WEBINAR (May 14th): How to Achieve Better Products to the Eye Through Virtual Prototyping? In the CADFEM webinar on May, 14, 2020 you will learn, how physics-based simulations - virtual prototyping - contribute to develop better lighting products. The live presentation pictures the whole process - from editing the geometric model to the definition of light sources and sensors to the use ... Read more »